Your call to action copy is just as important as the button itself. And even the smallest tweaks can have a major impact on your conversion rates. But how do you write button to copy that converts? Get the answer in this 6-minute session, where I’ve taken my experience from 4 years of testing button copy and distilled it into a simple principle you can use to consistently write your own high-impact button copy.

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Video Transcript:

Hello – I’m Michael Aagaard, thank you very much for joining this little session today on writing call to action copy that converts.

In this short video, I’ve taken my experience from four years of testing button copy and distilled it into a simple optimization principle and a few easy steps that you can use to consistently write high impact button copy of your own.

The thing you have to understand about calls-to-action is that they represent the tipping point between bounce and conversion. When you ask someone to do something online, they have to go through your CTA in order to do it. And the final thing that they are going to interact within that critical moment where they have to make up their minds is the button copy itself.

So even though tweaking a bit of button copy represents a minor change on the page, it will have a major impact on the decision-making process of your potential customers. And that’s why it’s so important to get it just right.

Getting it just right very much depends on the individual case. But what I have observed throughout all these tests that I’ve conducted is that the more value and relevance that you can convey via your call-to-action copy – the more conversions you’ll get. That’s the optimization principle I want you to understand today. So let’s have a look at a few case studies in order to illustrate how you can use the principle in practice.

Ok, so this is an example from one of my clients. They have a B2B website where they rent out offices. They have like 30.000 offices and when you find one that’s interesting you have to click a button to get more information sent via email. What you’re seeing here is the original button copy, the control version.

It could be worse. But the main problem with this call-to-action is that it doesn’t convey any value. It focuses on what you have to do – not what you are going to get. The word “order” itself is negative because it suggests that you have to go through the process – and who knows, maybe you have to go through 10 steps in order get the information you want. “Get” on the other hand is positive. It conveys value and emphasizes what you’re going to get – not what you have to do.

So as you can see – it’s a minor change that has a major impact on the messaging.

And when I tested it out in real life – it also turned out to have a major impact on the potential customers. Treatment A generated a lift of 38.26% in conversions. This call-to-action is located across 30.000 pages on the website. So you can imagine the accumulated impact of changing this one word.

So that was an example of how to add value The main thing here is to focus on what your potential customers are going to get – not what they have to do. Let’s have look at how to add relevance.

This is an example of another one of my other clients. It’s a chain of gyms here in Scandinavia. The button is taken from a PPC landing page where the goal is to get potential customers to click through to the check out flow where they can choose a gym and buy their membership. So this is the original button copy that I wrote. It already emphasizes value – is could have said “Buy membership” – which is negative – but it says “Get membership” emphasizing what you’re going to get. However, the button is generic, it’s not specific to the decision at hand – it could be used on pretty much any page that has to do with a membership.

Now I was thinking of ways to make the button more relevant. And I found out via customer surveys, that one of the most important factors, when you have to choose a gym membership, is the actual location of the gym.

So I came up with this variant. “Find a gym and get membership”. And when I tested it, it generated a 68% lift in conversions. So making that button super relevant to the specific conversion scenario had a significant impact on the decision making the process of the potential customers. So that was an example of adding relevance – the main thing here is to focus on what is relevant to the motivation of the prospect in the situation in which your asking him or her to click the button.

Ok, so what you can do know is to review your website – or pretty much anywhere to have a call to action for example an email – and look for places where the copy is either; a blatant order “SUBMIT” or “SEND”, or where it doesn’t convey value and focuses on what to have to do for example “BUY NOW”, or where the copy is generic and not very relevant for the specific conversion scenario “DOWNLOAD”.

When you’ve located a CTA that you want to optimize – then ask yourself 2 questions:

1. What is my prospect’s motivation for clicking this button?

2. What is my prospect going to get, when he/she clicks this button?

The answers you come up with are going to be the basis for the button copy. Of course, you’ll have to refine and tweak it – but it’s a great way to get started. I do urge you to test your new copy instead of just relying on gut instinct. As I said, your button copy has a major impact on conversions and you want to make certain that your moving in the right direction and the only way to that is to test it in real life.

And on that note, I’d like to say thank you for watching and I hope to see again someday soon. Bye, Bye!

Ben Gheliuc

Founder @BeemDigital

Ben is an Avid digital marketer that loves geeking out on Marketing Campaigns, PPC and SEO. With over 6 years of industry experience, he's been able to stay ahead of the curve on exactly what works to always deliver an ROI.

You'll find him battling Darth Vader dolls with his kids and the next hour diagnosing CRO for an Enterprise Company. You'll find him battling Darth Vader dolls with his kids and the next hour diagnosing CRO for an Enterprise Company.

Ben Gheliuc

Founder @BeemDigital

Ben is an Avid digital marketer that loves geeking out on Marketing Campaigns, PPC and SEO. With over 6 years of industry experience, he's been able to stay ahead of the curve on exactly what works to always deliver an ROI.

You'll find him battling Darth Vader dolls with his kids and the next hour diagnosing CRO for an Enterprise Company. You'll find him battling Darth Vader dolls with his kids and the next hour diagnosing CRO for an Enterprise Company.
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